Day Visit to Savannah

  We made a day visit to Savannah this week for its music festival (currently running there until April 14th). One of my favorite jazz artists is Hammond B3 organ great Dr. Lonnie Smith, and he was appearing with his trio for two evening performances and one earlier in the day. Although the lure of … Continue reading Day Visit to Savannah

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Keeping The Cookie Jar Full During Early Retirement

Against all her better instincts, not to mention I assume a clause in her blogger's liability insurance coverage, Donna over at Retirement Reflections has once again asked me to write a guest post. Please join the party there as I discuss the all important topic of eating cookies. Or... something remotely related to that anyway. … Continue reading Keeping The Cookie Jar Full During Early Retirement

Marty Made Me Write This.

To my regular followers, Doug might be a bit out of your comfort zone. But that’s his point anyway. He’s an undeclared poet laureate who endures cold Chicago winters and probably years of Ron Santo, North Side sadness. He might not be your cup of tea, but for those of you who like to take an occasional ride on political poetry, it’s my pleasure to share a master of the craft. He’s also a lover of vinyl and analogue, so he can’t be all bad.

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Sorry ‘bout the delay in getting back, (Marty) ya’ll. But trying to parse the 100 proof of today’s politics requires that aforementioned bourbon pour, and after five three fingers in four hours, I’ve been clued that Coda Puppy and I, now, somehow, seem to age at the same rate. What was once just another night of some mid-shelf everyday sippin’ whiskey, now locks me down for a full twenty-four.

And to further whore my amateur bore… of the true way that our politics be…I offer for your consideration …. Young Paul the Tall and his very pretty, smart, and caring, Girl Next Door, Mary Ann. They’ve been best friends forever…since Radio Shack sold computers. Now in their early to mid twenties, and with spring in the…our young man’s fancy…Paul turns not to his Mary Ann. Paul’s hero’s journey is to score a walk down the aisle with his Ginger…

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Powdering My Nose

A former co-worker and I were regular afternoon coffee companions back during my working years (Hi, H). At roughly the same time each day, one of us would launch an informal summons via the office chat application to query if it was convenient to make our daily trek to Starbucks. Invariably, though, my friend would always need just a little … Continue reading Powdering My Nose

GratiTuesday: Public Libraries

Janis writes a wonderful ode to the public library on her equally wonderful “Retirementally Challenged” blog. I couldn’t say it any better, though since I have made myself the Milton Berle of blog post intellectual property theft, I probably will hijack this at some future point too. Well done, Janis!

Retirementally Challenged

I spent a lot of time in my neighborhood library as I was growing up. I remember going with my mother at least once a week to check out books; usually borrowing two or three at a time. When I got older, I’d meet my friends there and we’d often do our homework sitting at the wooden desks they had scattered around. It was always kind of a magical place: not only did they have what seemed to be a never-ending supply of FREE books, but the building felt safe and familiar and the librarians were always a helpful source of information.

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For some reason, I stopped going to public libraries in my young adulthood. I never stopped reading, but my books mostly came from bookstores, yard sales, or were passed on to me by friends. Later, of course, I also started purchasing books from online sources.

After my husband…

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“All our SPCS family r safe”

A very timely, informative, and heartfelt posting about one school in Nepal. The blogger includes helpful links at the very end to contribute to relief efforts.

The Human Rights Warrior

SPCS students enjoying recess.  March 2015. (Credit:  Jennifer Prestholdt) Students at the Sankhu-Palubari Community School enjoying recess in March, 2015. (Credit: Jennifer Prestholdt)

Originally published on The Advocates’ Post.

“All our SPCS family r safe …”

This was the message I received from Anoop Poudel, headmaster at the Sankhu-Palubari Community School (SPCS), on Monday night. We had been desperately trying to reach Anoop and others connected with SPCS since the 7.8 earthquake devastated Nepal on Saturday, April 25.  Our concern grew as the death toll mounted and the strong aftershocks continued in the Kathmandu Valley. What a relief to learn that the teachers and 340 students at the school, as well as their families, are safe!

The Sankhu-Palubari Community School in the rural Kathmandu Valley, March 2015. (Credit: David Kistle) The Sankhu-Palubari Community School in the rural Kathmandu Valley, March 2015. (Credit: David Kistle)

In my role as The Advocates for Human Rights’ deputy director, I coordinate The Advocates’ Nepal School Project. I was in Nepal just a few weeks ago with…

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Arc of a Diver

I've been thinking quite a bit about perfection lately.  After unconditonal love, security, and happiness, I believe it is one of the most illusive of desires. Perfection can only really be a singular attribute.  It is usually noticeable by one characteristic: how something is done by someone else.  We will occasionally use the word in a sweeping way to describe an individual in … Continue reading Arc of a Diver

Green Peeves

I worked at an apartment and golf course complex in the summers of my college years. I cleaned the clubhouse floors, bathrooms, and took care of light maintenance for the pool. Most of that work took place in the morning.  In the afternoons I mowed grass around apartment buildings. The rest of my co-workers all had very specific … Continue reading Green Peeves